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is being held today. >> president obama is flying to newtown for today's memorial service. >> and cbs reporter erica ferrari is in newtown now to bring us the latest. good morning, erica. >> reporter: good morning. police have released the names and ages of the victims, but they haven't given any kind of a motive for what they think might have triggered this attack, this as families prepare to bury the dead. people filed into churches around newtown, connecticut to pray for victims of friday's shooting, as this community grievous, families in this small town now planning funerals for their children. >> she was the type of person that could just light up the room. she -- >> reporter: robbie parker's daughter, emilie was one of the 20 children killed in friday's shooting. >> she is an incredible person. and i'm so blessed to be her dad. >> reporter: parker and dozens of other parents had their children's bodies returned to them by authorities yesterday. police say they died when 20-year-old adam lanza forced his way into sandy hook elementary friday morning and started firing. president
captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" reporting live tonight from newtown. >> axelrod: good evening. newtown, connecticut was, by many measures, one of the safest communities in america. it is now the grief-stricken home of the second deadliest school shooting in u.s. history. 28 people are dead, including the shooter. late today, connecticut's chief medical examiner, wayne carver, reported that the autopsies on all the children are now complete. all 20 of them were shot more than once by 20-year-old adam lanza. police have also released the names of those killed, eight boys, 12 girls, between the ages of 6 and 7. all were first graders. six adults at the school were also murdered, and investigators say they now have some very good evidence explaining what wasde . we have a team of cbs news correspondents and producers on this still-developing story. we begin with margaret brennan here in newtown. >> reporter: gflg, jim. and the bodies of those 12 girls, eight boys, and six adult women killed right here in the sandy hook shooting yesterday are being returne
service tomorrow in newtown. >>> cbs reporter ines ferre is live in newtown, connecticut where investigators are piecing together what happened. ines. >> reporter: well, ann, it's been a day of mourning here in newtown and across the nation as families are grieving the loss of loved ones and a community tries to pull together. 12-year-old jocelyn cardenaz came from danbury, connecticut it drop off flowers at a memorial for the 26 people killed at sandy hook elementary school. >> even though we didn't know anyone directly just hurt because you never know what's going to happen next. >> reporter: she is one of many grieving for those gunned down in newtown, connecticut friday morning. investigators identified the shooter as 20-year-old adam lanza. the medical examiner says everyone was shot multiple times with a rifle. >> this probably is the worst i have seen. >> reporter: eight boys and 12 girls all ages 6 and 7 died including anna marcus green the daughter of a well-known saxophone player and emily parker who moved to newtown a year ago. >> she was a type person that could jus
in newtown. tonight the mourning is well under way. in the past two hours this vigil was held for victoria soto, the first grade teacher shot while trying to shield her first grade students from the gunman. her family says she lost her life doing what she loved. she was 27 years old. a live report from sandy hook in a moment but first, cbs 5 reporter don knapp is at a vigil in san francisco's dolores park. don. >> reporter: ann, even though we are a continent away from what happened in newtown, connecticut, people in san francisco in the bay area very much touched and troubled by what happened here. there was a vigil tonight one of about 16 or 17 around the bay area suggested by moveon.org. people decided to come down and bring their own candles. they stood in the rain and talked about what happened and offered each other support and talked about the title of their get together which is vigil to end gun violence. some people say even though we have a lot of violence in the united states, what happened this time with so many children may be the tipping point. one of those people is natalie
friday's heartbreaking violence in newtown, connecticut, we'll have the there's on continuing developments. we'll then turn to our cover story, which examines americans and faith. seems that for increasing numbers of us now, our permanent beliefs do not involve organized religion. >> reporter: this morning spiritual leaders around the country are faced with trying to explain the inexplicable. while some may seek solace in church, a growing number of americans are finding their faith elsewhere. >> it's less and and less important for people to think of themselves as methodist or baptist. >> reporter: how one of the most religious countrys in the world may be becoming a little less religious. ahead on "sunday morning." >> osgood: some kids byron pitts visited demonstrating amazing pluck, as you will see and hear. >> reporter: it may be an ancient instrument, with a heavenly sound. but in modern day atlanta, jarnl, the harp is about much much more. >> it is about opportunity. we don't expect everybody to become a professional harpist. it's about helping children to become all the
of them would tell you newtown, connecticut, was very much on their mind. >>> in the extended forecast, we have a whole lot more rainy days than sunny days. we'll take a look at that forecast. >>> good evening. i'm ann notarangelo. we begin with breaking news. a long police standoff on san francisco's nob hill is over. it began in an apartment building at california and hyde. and as the situation developed, the entire area was swarming with heavily armed police officers. don knapp was there. don, what happened? >> reporter: ann, this police operation is just now wrapping up. it ended the way you wanted it to end. they had swat teams here, negotiators, which tells you the two ways it could have ended. but in the end, the suspect gave up peacefully. residents gathered outside their california street apartments as spectators looked on. practically this entire block of california between larkin and hyde was filled with just about every type of emergency vehicle. police officers could be seen climbing nearby rooftops. all of this, the result of what police say started as a domestic disturbance
between the school system in newtown and his mom and we don't know what his experience was there. you know, when people describe him, bob, as a shy, awkward kid who had difficulty in social situations, but was also brilliant, that kind of sets the plate for the kind of kid who we all know from our own experiences in school has a high likelihood of being picked on or singled out or given a hard time. >> reporter: bob you asked lieutenant vance about the searches and computers recovered and of course he had to be careful. what our source tell us is the computers could be key. while the house was meticulous, and while the boy's room was meticulously maintained, two computers had been smashed, almost purposely, it seemed, smashed to smithereens. they've collected that information and-- all those parts, i should say. they've taken those now to computer forensic experts and what they'll tie 2 is try to reconstruct the data find out did he send any esnails were there any advanced warnings? did he detail his plans to anyone? it could be very important in finding out the motive. >> schieffer: john,
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7